My Blog

Posts for category: Skin Health

By SOUTH SHORE DERMATOLOGY PHYSICIANS
January 16, 2019
Category: Skin Health
Tags: Skin Type  

Learn the best way to care for your skin based on your skin type.

Just like fingerprints are unique to each individual person, so too is our skin. So what kind of skin type do you have, and why is it important? Let’s learn how to identify your skin type, so you can plan an effective skin care regime and combat the issues you may be prone to.

Normal Skin Type

Normal skin is characterized by few to no imperfections, no sensitivities and nearly invisible pores. Normal skin doesn’t have dry or oily patches.

Oily Skin Type

Oily skin is common in teenagers, who are going through various hormonal changes, but can affect adults as well. People with oily skin will deal with enlarged pores, shiny skin, and different kinds of blemishes (e.g. whiteheads; blackheads).

Dry Skin Type

Dry skin is exactly as it sounds; however, if you battle with dry skin you’ll most likely notice visible pores, red patches on your skin and the appearance of fine lines. Your skin may look dull and contain less elasticity than someone with normal skin. Factors that cause dry skin or exacerbate the condition include:

  • Genetics
  • Weather conditions
  • Hormonal changes
  • Indoor heating
  • Medications
  • Certain ingredients in skin care products

Combination Skin Type

If you have combination skin then you may notice that some parts are dry while others are oily. It’s not unusual to have an oily TĀ­zone, which makes up the nose, chin and forehead. It’s common for many people to have combination skin, and this skin type is prone to enlarged pores, blackheads and shiny areas.

Sensitive Skin Type

If you have been dealing with sensitive skin for a while now, then you may already know what triggers it. Those with sensitive skin often respond poorly to harsh or fragranced skin care products, which can create red, burning patches. Be sure to look for hypoallergenic products, which typically contain no potentially irritating fragrances or ingredients.

If you are still not sure what skin type you have, then you can always talk to your dermatologist. We are always here to discuss the best skin care regime for you. Remember, no two people’s skin is ever the same, so take time to figure out what works best for you. Call us today to schedule an appointment!

By SOUTH SHORE DERMATOLOGY PHYSICIANS
December 14, 2018
Category: Skin Health
Tags: Hives  

Hive outbreaks can be very itchyDiscover more about this common skin condition, and what you can do to treat your itchy symptoms.

What are hives? What are the symptoms of hives?

Also referred to as urticaria, hives are characterized by an outbreak of red bumps that suddenly show up on skin. Hives can appear anywhere on the body and often cause itching, burning and stinging. Some hives may be small, while others might form alongside  other bumps to create larger swellings.

What causes hives?

The most common causes of hives are foods, medications, and infections. Hives can also be triggered by insect bites. Foods that often bring about hives include dairy, fish, nuts and eggs. Medications such as aspirin and other over­the­counter anti­inflammatories like ibuprofen have also been known to cause hives.

There is another form of hives known as physical urticaria, which is triggered by and external physical factor such as cold, pressure, heat, exercise or sweating. This variety of hives usually appears within an hour after contact with one of these elements.

Are hives dangerous?

The majority of hives outbreaks are not dangerous ­ however, if you also experience dizziness, problems breathing, swelling of the face or tightness in your chest, then you should call for emergency assistance immediately! These can be signs of a life­threatening allergic reaction.

How are hives treated?

If you know what might be triggering your outbreaks, the best thing you can do is remove the trigger right away and avoid it as much as possible. Some people are able to take over­the-counter antihistamines like Benadryl to help relieve the itching. However, those with chronic hives may need to take a stronger antihistamine in combination with corticosteroids.

If you experience a severe outbreak, an epinephrine injection will need to be administered right away. Again, seek medical attention immediately!

To help relieve symptoms until the hives go away, you can also apply cold compresses to the areas to help ease any burning or itching. Also keep your bedroom and living space cool and opt for roomier clothing that won’t rub against the infected areas and exacerbate itching.

How long do hives last?

Some cases of hives clear up in only a few hours, while some can last for a full day before starting to fade.

If you are dealing with a nasty bout of hives that over­the­counter remedies don’t seem to fix, then it might be time to talk to your dermatologist about other treatment options. Call our office to schedule an appointment right away!

By SOUTH SHORE DERMATOLOGY PHYSICIANS
September 28, 2018
Category: Skin Health
Tags: Shingles   Chickenpox  

Shingles is a painful conditionWhat are the symptoms of and treatments for this painful dermatological condition?

Did you know that anyone who has had chickenpox is at risk for shingles, and that those over the age of 50 are more likely to develop this condition? Approximately one out of three Americans will have shingles at some point in their lives. Read on to learn more about this common problem.

What is shingles?

Shingles is caused by a virus known as the varicella­zoster virus, which is the same virus known to cause chickenpox. If you’ve had chickenpox before the virus never truly goes away. Instead it lies dormant within the nerves of the spinal cord and brain. When the virus is reactivated, it manifests as shingles.

What are the symptoms of shingles?

The main symptom of shingles is a red, painful rash that usually appears on one side of the body. The rash may be tender to the touch and typically causes intense itching. The rash is made up of blisters that burst and crust over. Your rash may also be accompanied by malaise, fever, or headache.

What are the risk factors for shingles?

Anyone who has been infected by chickenpox can have shingles. However, this illness is more common in those over the age of 50 and the risk continues to increase as you age.

Also, those who have a weakened immune system due to certain chronic diseases like HIV, or those currently undergoing cancer treatment may be at an increased risk of developing shingles.

Different shingles treatments

While there is no cure for this disease there are antiviral medications you can take to promote faster healing and to reduce your risk of developing other complications. If you are experiencing severe pain, we may also recommend prescription pain medications or creams to help ease your symptoms. Most people experience shingles symptoms for about two to six weeks.

Can I prevent shingles?

There are two vaccines that we recommend for preventing shingles. The first is the chickenpox vaccine, which is recommended for children and any adults who have never had chickenpox. The second vaccine is the shingles vaccine. While these vaccines aren’t 100 percent effective, they can greatly reduce your chances of developing shingles.

If your shingles rash has developed near your eye or is severely painful, then it’s time to see your dermatologist right away for treatment.